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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 25, 2022

Fully Engaged

Integrated Planning Was Leveraged to Optimize Community Participation in the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan

The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. We’re finding the engagement process is fast becoming as important a product of the plan as the plan itself. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process. Leveraging the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan as a case study, this article provides a framework for developing custom engagement strategies, and highlights examples, lessons learned, and tips for optimizing meaningful participation.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 30, 2020

Book Review: The New American College Town

Designing Effective Campus and Community Partnerships

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–Sep 2020

Abstract: by James Martin, James E. Samels & Associates
Johns Hopkins University Press
Baltimore, MD 21218
2019
328 Pages
ISBN 978-1421432786

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

Is a Capital Project on Your Plate?

A Guide to Developing Effective Places for Teaching and Learning

Here are eight steps proven to help planners navigate the complexities and avoid the pitfalls that are too often part of the process when planning and funding capital projects.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Do you have facility needs, like the need for more/improved space for instruction or infrastructure upgrades? Is it time to address deferred maintenance issues? Do you have reservations about venturing into unfamiliar territory? You’ll have to wrestle with some vexing matters—plan alternatives, big budgets, illusive funding sources, and an uninformed public.
Your concerns are valid. With a rich background as architectural firm principal and later as a community college project manager, the author has been through the drill. This article’s thoughtful advice details a project’s first phases—from initial concepts to developed projects with funding. It will head you toward success by helping to avoid the pitfalls.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

University-Industry Collaborations Are Driving Creation of Next-Generation Learning Space

New spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts, reflect a growing entrepreneurship and maker culture and give students the tools they need to succeed in a rapidly evolving marketplace.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Industry and academia are partnering like never before as entrepreneurship and maker culture become more important to our economy and a regular fixture in higher education curricula. With the influx of allied industry partnerships, evolving pedagogies, entrepreneurship programs, and a maker culture comes a pressing need for new spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts devoted to new kinds of research partnerships. Schools like the University of Washington, Babson College, and Arizona State University are leading the way on new collaborations. In this article, Sasaki planners and urban designers examine how design disruption will guide the development of campuses that enable 21st-century teaching, learning, and research paradigms.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2015

Engaged Institutions, Responsiveness, and Town-Gown Relationships

Why Deep Culture Change Must Emphasize the Gathering of Community Feedback

Campus planners cannot discern the future requirements of their host communities if they do not know what those stakeholders want and need from their local institutions of higher learning.

From Volume 43 Number 4 | July–September 2015

Abstract: Colleges and universities typically do not gather routine feedback from community stakeholders, despite the fact that various organizations dedicated to the advancement of higher education continually have clamored for campus representatives to be more responsive to members of host communities. Recent petitions for “deep culture” change within academia—in combination with recent methodological advances in efforts to understand town-gown relationships—provide a comprehensible set of motives and details for institutions to become more fully engaged in the process of collecting systematic information from community members. A review of recent efforts to conceptualize and measure town-gown relationships using a tool known as the Optimal College Town Assessment (OCTA) is provided. After reviewing results from a previous study that piloted the OCTA tool, qualitative data gathered from a subset of community stakeholders in that original sample are presented and analyzed. The resulting themes are described and discussed in the context of enhancing evidence-based campus planning efforts that meet the call for greater higher education responsiveness.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2012

A Tribute to Achievement and Excellence

2012 SCUP Awards

The society’s 2012 awards recognize and applaud individuals and organizations whose achievements exemplify excellence and dedication in planning for higher education.

From Volume 41 Number 1 | October–December 2012

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2011

A Half-Century of Change on College Hill

Institutional Growth, Historic Preservation, and the College Hill Study

One of the epicenters of the historic preservation movement in the United States, the east side of Providence is also home to Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design. Preservation leaders and institutional leaders—sometimes adversaries, sometimes partners—took a meandering path toward the expansive notion of Historic Providence that we see today. This article will explore the changing notions of cities, preservation, and institutional development on what is aptly called College Hill. It is a story of mutual support, conflicting values, and an extraordinary act of planning: the College Hill Study.

From Volume 39 Number 3 | April–June 2011

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2009

Creating Global-Ready Places

The Campus-Community Connection

Global demographics are shaping new civic patterns which will strengthen the relationship between universities and cities in ways that create local prosperity.

From Volume 37 Number 4 | July–September 2009

Abstract: Globalization is reshaping the relationship between U.S. universities and their host cities. U.S. universities must adjust to momentous changes in the worldwide higher education system, and U.S. cities must retool to maintain their place in the innovation economy. Institutional and civic resources are being pooled to form global-ready urban environments, giving rise to a new generation of urban settings. This article describes the historic cosmopolitan connection between cities and universities, discusses the global forces affecting that relationship today, and offers case illustrations of campus-oriented civic change in three U.S. localities.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2007

Traffic Congestion on a University Campus

A Consideration of Unconventional Remedies to Nontraditional Transportation Patterns

Universities are in a special position to take information related to the patterns and causes of congestion and apply it to their planning goals. In particular, they can work effectively to reduce demand.

From Volume 36 Number 1 | October–December 2007

Abstract: U.S. transportation data suggest that the number of vehicle miles traveled has far surpassed new capacity, resulting in increased traffic congestion in many communities throughout the country. This article reports on traffic congestion around a university campus located within a small town. The mix of trip purposes varies considerably in this context, with the majority of trips related to student movement to and from classes. The university itself becomes a major traffic generator, but in a complex way. This article describes how congestion in a university setting differs from that in a nonuniversity setting; what components drive this congestion; how best to reduce this congestion while adhering to overall university planning objectives; and how to set a foundation for traffic management strategies that provide environmental, social, and economic benefit to the university and, importantly, to the surrounding community. The information presented here applies beyond the campus setting to any community that contains nontraditional traffic generators and shows why context does matter when analyzing and managing traffic.

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