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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 22, 2022

Getting in the eGame

Esports Streaming Gives the University of Kentucky a New Way to Grow Revenue and Recruit Students

The University of Kentucky understood the importance of technology in preparing students for the digital world. With public-private partnerships, it sought opportunities to be an industry leader in leveraging that capacity for its students, faculty, staff, and the community.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The University of Kentucky (UK) and the University of Kentucky Esports Club worked together to establish the University of Kentucky Esports Lounge. Students were surveyed on their gaming needs, and the resulting wish list (i.e., equipment selection, space configuration, furniture, etc.) fed into the decision-making process by all constituents. The project budget was derived by a larger construction project at the University that focused on student recruitment, community, and connection to the non-student demographic. The UK team ultimately planned and launched the custom facility to meet users’ particular needs—while finding a way for the University to produce an additional revenue stream.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 2003

The Impact of Technologies on Learning

A study at the University of Washington called “Listening to the Learner, ” asked students about their desire for using technology in coursework, and facult about current approaches/barriers. Curricula were developed that intergrate education technology in a learner-centered way.

From Volume 32 Number 2 | December–February 2003

Abstract: Today’s college students believe that learning technologies are necessary tools that should be integrated into their course work. However, faculty have not yet responded to these expectations. This qualitative study engaged approximately 100 faculty and undergraduate students at the University of Washington in focus groups to explore this discrepancy between students’ desires to utilize technology and actual faculty integration of technology. Universities and colleges can resolve this digital disconnect by assisting in planning curricula to meet student and teacher needs, aligning support and services to technology adoption to overcome present barriers, and informing the design and development of educational technology.

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