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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 15, 2023

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Survival of the Financially Fittest

Leverage Strategic Decision-Making and Key Financial Metrics to Achieve Financial Stability

Leaders must look closely at financial trends that may reveal signs of trouble—in the short or immediate term—and have the courage to act to address them.

From Volume 52 Number 1 | October–December 2023

Abstract: This article explores a methodology for assessing and managing the financial viability of private, tuition-dependent institutions as well as institutional tactics and strategies used to improve their financial strength. The resulting model will help institutions understand the trends and predictive value of key financial metrics directly impacting their liquidity and operations and how senior leadership can drive change. Institutional examples illustrate how to engage senior leadership in strategic decision-making that includes assessment of revenue growth and/or expense management.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 28, 2023

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Why Do Most Institutional Presidents Look Roughly the Same?

Plan for Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Diversity in a Presidential Search

An institution’s governing board should determine how diversity initiatives will be prioritized during the search process.

From Volume 51 Number 4 | July–September 2023

Abstract: The presidential search process is an opportunity for the institution to plan for and vet potential leaders who will play a pivotal role in the success or failure of diversity initiatives. A key question to ask during searches is whether the growing student diversity on campus is present within the presidential search itself. We advocate for institutional governing boards to commit to creating lasting, cultural change and including DEI efforts in the presidential hiring process.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 23, 2023

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Quickly Building a Bridge

Use an Institutional Effectiveness Planning Model to Drive Strategic Planning

Executive leadership changes at Northern Michigan University led the interim president, interim provost, and Board of Trustees to call for a bridge plan to clearly articulate strategic work happening throughout campus. This article describes how the university was able to develop an interim strategic plan with broad campus engagement in less than half a year.

From Volume 51 Number 3 | April–June 2023

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 11, 2021

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Breaking Barriers

A Collaborative Approach to Problem-Solving Created a Culture of Campus Innovation

The University of West Georgia, toward dismantling silo thinking and promoting a sense of ownership within the workplace, formed a cross-divisional group: The Barriers Team. It was part of an initiative to recognize and encourage employee engagement, develop operational efficiencies and effectiveness, and eliminate obstructions to staff success.

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: This article outlines the process by which a public university sought to develop and grow a culture of problem-solving and innovation at a time when the institution was undergoing a number of transitions. By developing a Barriers Team, the institution brought together a group of individuals representing all aspects of the university and charged the members with tackling barriers to success. The authors outline how they used the institution’s strategic plan as a starting point, and then describe the steps, provide examples, and reflect on the long-range viability of the approach.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2013

Succession Planning

The Key to Ensuring Leadership

The key is that the process of leadership formation is not random and serendipitous, but rather intentional and well planned.

From Volume 41 Number 3 | March–May 2013

Abstract: Most colleges and universities have well-developed strategic plans. But these plans may not be helpful if there is a sudden or unexpected leadership transition or crisis. Sadly, succession planning is the least understood and practiced form of planning in higher education. This neglect often results in leadership crises, confusion in leadership, disorganized search and transition processes, and a lack of appropriate professional development. This article provides a clear explanation of the meaning and purpose of succession planning as well as a guideline and process for implementing succession planning in any institution of higher education.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2009

The President’s Role in Cultivating Positive Town-Gown Relations

College presidents should strive to engage their colleges and communities to develop a college town atmosphere and economy.

From Volume 37 Number 4 | July–September 2009

Abstract: This article examines the benefits and challenges a college president faces when attempting to cultivate relationships with the community in which the college resides. Throughout history, the relationships between institutions of higher education and the communities that house them have often been turbulent, but much good can be realized when true collaboration is achieved. The author shares examples of colleges that have achieved positive outcomes from partnerships and explains why creating a cooperative environment benefits the college. The author’s experiences at a small Georgia college—both successes and failures—show how active management can build a vibrant town-gown community.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2009

Presidential Transitions

It's Not the Position, It's the Transition

From Volume 37 Number 3 | April–June 2009

Abstract: Book Review: Presidential Transitions by Patrick H. Sanaghan, Larry Goldstein, and Kathleen D. Gaval
Praeger 2008
207 pages
ISBN: 978-0-275-99408-2

Reviewed by Stephen Joel Trachtenberg

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2006

How Strategic Presidential Leadership and Institutional Culture Influenced Fund-Raising Effectiveness at Spelman College

An explanatory case study qualitatively examines Spelman College using the presidential leadership strategy, decision approaches, and preferred institutional culture types of three past presidents as the embedded units of analysis. Despite novel leadership strategies and unique decision approaches, each president's fund-raising initiatives were successful. Viewing fundraising through these lenses provides a good starting point for institutional planners desiring to develop a research agenda for more effective funding-raising campaigns.

From Volume 35 Number 1 | October–December 2006

Abstract: How have presidential leadership strategy, decision approaches, and institutional culture preferences influenced fund-raising effectiveness at a historically Black college for women? These conceptual dimensions guided a qualitative study that interviewed three recent Spelman College presidents and investigated documentary evidence to develop an understanding of each president's relative successes. Although generalizability is not possible when studying a single institution, the three very individualistic approaches to fund-raising adopted by these presidents indicate the contextual nature of fund-raising effectiveness and highlight the need for knowledgeable institutional planners who understand each of these conceptual dimensions to accommodate the varying contexts of their institutions.

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