SCUP
The SCUP office will be closed Friday, July 1 at noon eastern through July 4.
We hope you all have a wonderful and safe 4th of July holiday.
 

Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

FOUND 40 RESOURCES

REFINED BY:

  • Format: Planning for Higher Education Journalx
  • Tags: Facilities Planningx

Clear All
ABSTRACT:  | 
SORT BY:  | 
Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 8, 2022

Seven Lessons in Inclusive Campus Design

Learn How the University of Kentucky Developed Its First DEI Facilities and Spaces Plan

Institutions are starting to grapple with histories of developing indigenous lands and the legacy of an able-bodied vernacular within campus design that continues to reinforce in-groups and out-groups.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: A global health crisis intersecting with a racial reckoning has led to a renewed commitment to reflect on complex histories and plan for more inclusive futures on many American campuses. Institutions, which benefitted from traditional hierarchies of power, are starting to grapple with histories of developing indigenous lands and the legacy of a western and able-bodied vernacular within campus design that continues to reinforce in-groups and out-groups. The authors are presently leading first-of-their-kind DEI planning initiatives; in this article they unpack how a public institution is meeting their past head-on to plan better futures.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 25, 2022

Scaling Active Learning Classrooms

Adopt 11 Best Practices to Transform Existing Spaces to Support Student Success

A large-scale study uncovered factors that led to successful scaling of active learning spaces and pedagogical approaches in colleges and universities.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Active learning has been a growing trend in higher education for decades based on its positive impact on student learning and success. Colleges and universities have invested resources into expanding this teaching approach by using active learning classrooms (ALCs). But why have some institutions been successful at rapidly growing their ALCs and learning spaces, while others have struggled? This article, focusing on the higher education arena, summarizes the best practices from a large-scale study that uncovered factors that led to successful scaling of learning spaces and pedagogical approaches in colleges and universities.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 25, 2022

Fully Engaged

Integrated Planning Was Leveraged to Optimize Community Participation in the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan

The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. We’re finding the engagement process is fast becoming as important a product of the plan as the plan itself. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process. Leveraging the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan as a case study, this article provides a framework for developing custom engagement strategies, and highlights examples, lessons learned, and tips for optimizing meaningful participation.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 22, 2022

Getting in the eGame

Esports Streaming Gives the University of Kentucky a New Way to Grow Revenue and Recruit Students

The University of Kentucky understood the importance of technology in preparing students for the digital world. With public-private partnerships, it sought opportunities to be an industry leader in leveraging that capacity for its students, faculty, staff, and the community.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The University of Kentucky (UK) and the University of Kentucky Esports Club worked together to establish the University of Kentucky Esports Lounge. Students were surveyed on their gaming needs, and the resulting wish list (i.e., equipment selection, space configuration, furniture, etc.) fed into the decision-making process by all constituents. The project budget was derived by a larger construction project at the University that focused on student recruitment, community, and connection to the non-student demographic. The UK team ultimately planned and launched the custom facility to meet users’ particular needs—while finding a way for the University to produce an additional revenue stream.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 26, 2021

Space Jam

How to Accommodate Campus Events and Meetings This Fall

Much of the conversation around the return to campus this fall has focused on academic courses. But other events and meetings will also need to be accommodated.

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: This article discusses an approach for campus meetings and events, such as study sessions, student group meetings, guest speaker presentations, etc., this coming academic year. It also aims to leverage the discussion about near-term needs to generate a more conceptual and flexible understanding of programming, space use, and virtual interaction within higher education.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 14, 2021

Good Academic Planning Is What Happens . . .

. . . When Opportunity Meets with Integration

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: The division of Academic Affairs at the University of West Georgia became involved with the Society for College and University Planning and integrated planning over four years ago. The result was slowly integrating academic planning with facilities, accreditation, budget, student affairs, and student success. Just as Thomas Edison was probably not thinking about integrated planning when he was quoted on planning, we had no idea how fruitful our efforts would become. We enhanced and assessed student scheduling, learning spaces, faculty support, and student success and support services in a meaningful way that resulted in positive and measurable outcomes for improving learning and reducing costs.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 8, 2020

‘Colorblind-Spots’ in Campus Design

Planners and Architects Can Offer Solutions That Center on Social Justice

Educational leaders are noting that conventional campus design planning efforts have neglected to include the voices of historically underserved communities. Socio-spatial inquiry can help institutions offer an equity approach to inclusivity and authentic engagement.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: To gain a broader understanding of how educational equity is linked to campus design, architects and planners must critically examine community engagement practices. Using critical race theory (CRT) as a framework has exposed racial exclusion and colorblind practices in traditional planning processes. While outreach strategies have received greater scrutiny, less examined are the questions that direct those activities. If the prevailing understanding of a design problem is informed by colorblind inquiry, then design solutions hold little promise to improve social impact on communities most affected by educational inequity. Socio-spatial inquiry offers an equity approach to inclusive outreach and authentic engagement.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2020

From Lagging to Leading

Bentley University and Boston College Sack Stereotypes About Athletic Facility Sustainability and Energy Performance

An integrated team of cross-discipline collaborators accomplished their objective of creatively reimagining athletic facilities at two institutions for the greater good of each campus and its community. Using sustainable and cost-efficient design opportunities and aligned technologies, they succeeded in countering the outdated stereotype of the athletic building as a lagging energy performer.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: Athletic buildings suffer from a long-held image problem. Fieldhouses, hockey and basketball arenas, and other large indoor competition and practice facilities traditionally lag other campus spaces in energy performance and sustainability. However, because of the size, scale, and location of athletic buildings, there is significant untapped potential as campus planners seek creative ways to implement change initiatives. The authors share lessons learned from their recent experiences applying imaginative, cost-efficient approaches to sports and recreation buildings. In addition to reimagining how the facilities can contribute to the greater good of the entire campus, they demonstrate the value of early cross-discipline collaboration and problem-solving to fulfill shared aspirations.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
August 13, 2020

De-Densifying Classrooms in the COVID-19 Era

A Scalable and Accurate Non-Linear Model Projects New Distanced Space Capacities

Columbia College Chicago’s “logistic growth model,” a mathematical model that is adaptable to highly variable campus spaces, gives priority to human-centered solutions while also promoting physical and emotional well-being. It can flexibly accommodate instructors, teaching assistants, and students for different pedagogical uses and within different types of facilities.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: Campus space planning generally involves the use of linear models that apply a simple square-foot-per-person calculation to determine capacities for different room sizes. Most return-to-campus strategies following the easing of COVID-19 shelter-in-place restrictions involve modification of these models, increasing square-footage-per-person to accommodate six feet of distancing. This provides reasonable upper and lower capacity estimates, but it does not yield accurate estimates across different room sizes and room types. Columbia College Chicago has developed a non-linear model that is both scalable and accurate, resulting in estimates that match test fits across all observed spaces.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 7, 2020

Universal Design in the Age of COVID-19

Changes Are Demanding That Campuses Include All Learners

Demographics on campuses have changed, expectations for accessibility have increased, and the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the need to provide inclusive experiences for all learners. Thirty years after the ADA was signed into law, much has been achieved; however, there is more to be accomplished at colleges and universities if we are to provide inclusive experiences for all learners. A renewed approach to campus planning and design, informed by the principles of Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning, and with a commitment to delivering hybridized online and in-person models of educational delivery, is needed now.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: In context of COVID-19, institutions are developing new approaches to online learning at an unprecedented pace. Looking ahead, this great experiment may offer lessons for broadening the definition of accessibility. Three decades after the Americans with Disabilities Act established minimum accessibility standards for the built environment, this moment of accelerated change presents a unique opportunity to utilize hybrid delivery models and universal design principles to rethink accessibility. Sasaki principal Greg Havens examines how continued emphasis on improvements to the physical environment, when combined with hybrid learning and services, could transform the way we plan the human-centered, accessible campuses of tomorrow.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access