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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 19, 2022

Partnerships Promote Inclusion

A university and a secondary school collaborate to decrease dropout rates and increase college enrollment

Intentional planning and a competency-based, personalized learning model empowers graduate students from the architecture discipline to assist secondary students in becoming knowledge seekers and design professionals.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: American industries, professional organizations, individual companies, and higher education institutions continue to struggle to attract employees from underrepresented populations. Future-forward thinking is required to ensure a multicultural workforce. The authors, a design educator at a predominantly white, Midwestern university, and a high school principal at a multicultural urban school district, developed an intentional collaboration—partnerships between secondary and postsecondary institutions—to bridge the gap. In this article, they share strategies they developed for recruiting and retaining underrepresented students through intentional planning and design of competency-based, personalized learning models.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2019

Toward Commercializing University Research in the Caribbean

Creating a Science and Technology Park Model

STPs can boost declining economies by reaping profits from innovations and products created through university research. Yet given the capital and time investment for a project to be viable, The University of the West Indies should gain commitment from all constituents—especially regional governments and the private sector—prior to beginning development.

From Volume 47 Number 4 | July–September 2019

Abstract: This article explores whether the development of science and technology parks by The University of the West Indies (UWI) is the best solution for commercializing university research through academic spin-off businesses and as a means to supporting dwindling regional economies.

The article discusses two international best-practice technology parks in the United Kingdom and a study of the only technology park in the Caribbean. Further, a gap analysis was conducted of all existing functions/institutes/centers across three main campuses in the countries of Jamaica, Barbados, and Trinidad and Tobago, which perform similar types of functions as technology parks.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2019

Middle Skills Education

Planners Are Reimagining Ways to Meld Instruction and Industry

Many jobs of the future will require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree. How should we prepare the next generation of employees?

From Volume 47 Number 4 | July–September 2019

Abstract: Middle skills education, personalized curriculum, and student-directed training are playing an increasingly integral role in higher education. A new generation of students is already likely to hold different educational expectations and desires than their predecessors. Accommodating those trends means planners, architects, and higher education administrators will need to think differently about how they train skilled workers for the most needed professions.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

University-Industry Collaborations Are Driving Creation of Next-Generation Learning Space

New spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts, reflect a growing entrepreneurship and maker culture and give students the tools they need to succeed in a rapidly evolving marketplace.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Industry and academia are partnering like never before as entrepreneurship and maker culture become more important to our economy and a regular fixture in higher education curricula. With the influx of allied industry partnerships, evolving pedagogies, entrepreneurship programs, and a maker culture comes a pressing need for new spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts devoted to new kinds of research partnerships. Schools like the University of Washington, Babson College, and Arizona State University are leading the way on new collaborations. In this article, Sasaki planners and urban designers examine how design disruption will guide the development of campuses that enable 21st-century teaching, learning, and research paradigms.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

Changing the Future of Health Care

The University of North Dakota’s New School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Designed and built for collaborative, interdisciplinary education through a highly engaged process, this building transforms health care education and health care for the entire state.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: With North Dakota experiencing a significant shortage in all health care-related fields, the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences replaced its aging facility with a new school in order to (1) increase enrollment by 25 percent, (2) attract and retain top-tier faculty and staff, (3) encourage inter-professional collaboration, (4) colocate all eight medical, health sciences, and basic sciences in one building, and (5) retain more in-state graduates. The facility is now a shared collaborative learning environment, the result of the university “rethinking everything” about how it delivered health sciences education.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

Lessons Learned from Strategic Planning for Improved Teaching and Learning in Developing Economies

U.S. institutions have much to learn from the major transformations of teaching and learning achieved by higher education institutions in developing economies faced with limited funding and inhospitable environments.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2017

Integrating Board, System, and University Planning and Performance During a Period of Rapidly Declining State Funding Commitment

Even in the most difficult financial times, integrating planning and budgeting throughout the organization creates opportunities for success.

From Volume 45 Number 3 | April–June 2017

Abstract: In 2009 the Arizona University System (supporting over 130,000 enrollments) through its Board of Regents directed its board president and the presidents of Arizona State University, University of Arizona, and Northern Arizona University to create an operational plan that reflected the board’s vision, goals, and strategic directions. A primary objective was to transform the system (or enterprise) vision into concrete goals and outcomes that would directly connect to financial decision making at the system and university level. The backdrop for higher education planning and budgeting expectations included the continuation of severe reductions in state funding, rapidly increasing student tuition and fees, and a call for greater accountability. The planning processes were characterized by the integration of board and presidential discussions, inclusion of constituent debate, identification of strategic choices, and approval of outcomes focused on measuring performance. The integration ran across and within three organizations or levels that included the Arizona Board of Regents, its system administration, and the three universities.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2016

Symbiosis

Community Colleges Strengthen Mission by Engaging Their Host Communities through Innovative Partnerships

Partnership opportunities are broad and plentiful—only limited by an institution’s imagination.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: Strategic partnerships are a smart fiscal and educational move for higher education institutions. Many of the nation’s community colleges have long explored symbiotic arrangements that benefit student, community, and school. This article examines three schools’ interactions with their host communities and explores how partnerships help deliver on their role as a true community amenity—from providing their students with state-of-the-art learning environments and working with industry leaders to enhance curricula to reaching a geographically disadvantaged demographic of potential students. Partnership opportunities are broad and plentiful and are often only limited by an institution’s imagination.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2016

The Power of “Systemness”

A Collaborative Approach Aids Workers in New York State

What was needed was an organized, comprehensive program to equip workers with the skills to survive and thrive in the world of 21st-century manufacturing.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: The community colleges in the State University of New York system leveraged “systemness”—the idea that working together can greatly enhance the possibility of positive results—in creating a statewide program to retrain dislocated TAA-eligible workers and returning veterans for high-quality, high-paying jobs in the skilled manufacturing sector. By aligning with the strengths of each college, curricula in areas such as photonics, optics, advanced manufacturing and machining, and semiconductors and mechatronics were created, leading to a diploma or certification and thus to increased probability of hiring. Regional employers and government workforce agencies were also part of the leadership teams, helping to create programming that was specifically focused on the needs of these vital industries.

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