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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 25, 2022

Fully Engaged

Integrated Planning Was Leveraged to Optimize Community Participation in the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan

The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. We’re finding the engagement process is fast becoming as important a product of the plan as the plan itself. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process. Leveraging the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan as a case study, this article provides a framework for developing custom engagement strategies, and highlights examples, lessons learned, and tips for optimizing meaningful participation.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 30, 2020

Essentially There

Higher Education Returns to Serve

There is a call for higher education institutions to think of ways that knowledge can be created and shared between people— credentialed and noncredentialed—more readily so that society can better handle adversities.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: The education sector is excluded from the 16 official “Critical Infrastructure Sectors” managed by the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency. As the world grapples with a pandemic, this omission lays bare a disconnection between critical infrastructures serving daily life and the ground plane of learning and knowledge creation on which they are built; such a severing between ground plane and structure does not bode well for the entire assembly. For us to flourish as a society, higher education institutions—already grounded in a landscape of learning and knowledge creation—need to be a foundational support to essential infrastructures sustaining daily life in communities small and large.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 8, 2020

‘Colorblind-Spots’ in Campus Design

Planners and Architects Can Offer Solutions That Center on Social Justice

Educational leaders are noting that conventional campus design planning efforts have neglected to include the voices of historically underserved communities. Socio-spatial inquiry can help institutions offer an equity approach to inclusivity and authentic engagement.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: To gain a broader understanding of how educational equity is linked to campus design, architects and planners must critically examine community engagement practices. Using critical race theory (CRT) as a framework has exposed racial exclusion and colorblind practices in traditional planning processes. While outreach strategies have received greater scrutiny, less examined are the questions that direct those activities. If the prevailing understanding of a design problem is informed by colorblind inquiry, then design solutions hold little promise to improve social impact on communities most affected by educational inequity. Socio-spatial inquiry offers an equity approach to inclusive outreach and authentic engagement.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 30, 2020

Book Review: The New American College Town

Designing Effective Campus and Community Partnerships

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–Sep 2020

Abstract: by James Martin, James E. Samels & Associates
Johns Hopkins University Press
Baltimore, MD 21218
2019
328 Pages
ISBN 978-1421432786

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2019

Book Review: Research Universities and the Public Good

Discovery for an Uncertain Future

This book offers a good look inside the way research faculty view their role in the university. The perspectives shared are broadly applicable for all planners at post-secondary institutions, especially in their considering complex organizations that have both unlimited potential and finite resources.

From Volume 47 Number 4 | July–September 2019

Abstract: by Jason Owen-Smith
Stanford University Press, Palo Alto, CA 2018
213 pages
ISBN 9781503607095

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

Is a Capital Project on Your Plate?

A Guide to Developing Effective Places for Teaching and Learning

Here are eight steps proven to help planners navigate the complexities and avoid the pitfalls that are too often part of the process when planning and funding capital projects.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Do you have facility needs, like the need for more/improved space for instruction or infrastructure upgrades? Is it time to address deferred maintenance issues? Do you have reservations about venturing into unfamiliar territory? You’ll have to wrestle with some vexing matters—plan alternatives, big budgets, illusive funding sources, and an uninformed public.
Your concerns are valid. With a rich background as architectural firm principal and later as a community college project manager, the author has been through the drill. This article’s thoughtful advice details a project’s first phases—from initial concepts to developed projects with funding. It will head you toward success by helping to avoid the pitfalls.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2016

“Menus That Matter” at the Heart of Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s Bronson Healthy Living Campus

Culinary and food professionals can serve as positive change agents in society.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: We live at a time when increasing numbers of Americans consume food prepared away from home. This trend, along with poor dietary choices and lack of access to healthy, sustainably sourced food, contributes to a reduced quality of life and the onset of preventable disease.
The Culinary Arts and Sustainable Food Systems curriculum recently approved by the Kalamazoo Valley Community College trustees reflects the college’s belief that best practices in urban agriculture, the latest developments in culinary and food production research and technology, and the transformative power of education will improve the health and well-being of our citizens and help sustain our communities. The college believes that culinary and food professionals can serve as positive change agents in society.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2015

Engaged Institutions, Responsiveness, and Town-Gown Relationships

Why Deep Culture Change Must Emphasize the Gathering of Community Feedback

Campus planners cannot discern the future requirements of their host communities if they do not know what those stakeholders want and need from their local institutions of higher learning.

From Volume 43 Number 4 | July–September 2015

Abstract: Colleges and universities typically do not gather routine feedback from community stakeholders, despite the fact that various organizations dedicated to the advancement of higher education continually have clamored for campus representatives to be more responsive to members of host communities. Recent petitions for “deep culture” change within academia—in combination with recent methodological advances in efforts to understand town-gown relationships—provide a comprehensible set of motives and details for institutions to become more fully engaged in the process of collecting systematic information from community members. A review of recent efforts to conceptualize and measure town-gown relationships using a tool known as the Optimal College Town Assessment (OCTA) is provided. After reviewing results from a previous study that piloted the OCTA tool, qualitative data gathered from a subset of community stakeholders in that original sample are presented and analyzed. The resulting themes are described and discussed in the context of enhancing evidence-based campus planning efforts that meet the call for greater higher education responsiveness.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2015

Creating a New Campus Destination

The project offers preservation, building revitalization, and adaptive reuse as an alternative model for sustainable campus growth.

From Volume 43 Number 4 | July–September 2015

Abstract: Aged buildings, streets, alleys, back lots, a dense neighborhood, and historic landmarks—can these puzzle pieces add up to campus opportunities? The University of Chicago conceived an unexpected and dynamic new campus destination, gaining 150,500 sq. ft. of academic space and creating a new landscape with 36,000 sq. ft. of new open space and 60 new trees. Neighbors, aldermen, administration, and faculty shaped a campus planning process applicable to large and small colleges and universities, developed from creative and sustainable planning principles.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2013

Cultivating Integration

Urban Farming on a Medical University Campus

The MUSC Urban Farm is designed to be a living classroom where students, faculty, staff, and the community come together to explore the connection between food and health.

From Volume 41 Number 3 | March–May 2013

Abstract: Chronic disease is rapidly diminishing the health of our nation as rates of serious physical and psychological conditions such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, depression, and emotional stress continue to rise. The urban agricultural movement is one strategy that has demonstrated promise in combating the increasing costs of chronic disease related to poor health behaviors. A half-acre urban farm is developed on a medical university campus and thrives in spite of an uncertain economic climate and skepticism among some stakeholders. Details related to planning, programming, and sustainability are described and successes as well as challenges are highlighted in this case study that might serve as a template for others seeking to develop campus gardens.

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