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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 26, 2022

Around the Water Cooler, Minus the Water Cooler

Build College Community, Resilience, and Trust through Campus-Wide Meetings

More than 100 Muskegon Community College employees attend weekly, all-college meetings. These are essential touchpoints for communication, learning, and planning.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Since 2011 Michigan’s Muskegon Community College has held all-campus meetings every Friday morning. Initially the meetings were for student services staff to share information and updates. When COVID-19 caused a rapid shift to virtual course and service delivery, meeting attendance more than tripled as the college community drew together to understand what was happening, what was needed from and expected of employees, and how to connect with colleagues when doing so in person was not possible.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 26, 2022

Book Review: Work Force Rx

Agile and Inclusive Strategies for Employers, Educators and Workers in Unsettled Times

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Work Force Rx: Agile and Inclusive Strategies for Employers, Educators and Workers in Unsettled Times
by Van Ton-Quinlivan
Master Catalyst Press: mastercatalyst.org: 2021
266 pages
ISBN: 978-1737627524

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 9, 2021

Leveraging Institutional Planning to Benefit Latinx Students

Racially Disaggregated and Actionable Data Improve Community College Transfer Success

How can institutional planners make a difference for underrepresented minority students? Senior administrators at East Los Angeles College addressed inequities in Latinx student transfer rates with data-backed culturally-relevant strategies.

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: California Community Colleges, since 2014, have explicitly targeted retention, transfer, and completion outcomes through a mandated planning process supported by newly-allocated fiscal resources. The policy focuses on equity-driven institutional planning that identifies and addresses disparities for specific groups (e.g., Latinx students, foster youths, veterans). This article shares insight from five years of case study research, exploring how senior administrators address Latinx student transfer inequity through new culturally-relevant strategies. Within California, Latinx students comprise the largest share of transfer-aspirants, but they have significantly lower rates of academic success. Key lessons are shared to leverage planning efforts to improve outcomes for underrepresented minority students.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 8, 2020

Promoting Engagement in Strategic Planning

Southeast Community College Used FAST Goals to Capture Stakeholder Interest

Creating a positive, reflective, inclusive, and transparent institutional climate facilitated improved engagement in and ownership of strategic and departmental planning. The process of using FAST goals (frequently discussed, ambitious, specifically measured, and transparent) produced constructive outcomes.

From Volume 48 Number 3 | April–June 2020

Abstract: Southeast Community College (SCC) transformed its departmental planning by embedding a cultural goal within its strategic plan. The goal focused on creating a positive, reflective, inclusive, and transparent institutional climate—through the implementation of departmental FAST goals. That goal type refers to those that are frequently discussed, ambitious, specifically measured, and transparent, which represents an alternative to the commonly used SMART goal-setting approach. This article describes how a change of climate at SCC set the stage for the conversion to FAST goals—and improved engagement in and ownership of strategic and departmental planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2017

Planning at Mesa Community College

Integrated and Informed for Our Improvement

Within the span of a year, it’s possible to make significant progress toward achieving and institutionalizing integrated planning and budgeting.

From Volume 45 Number 3 | April–June 2017

Abstract: In an era of heightened accreditation expectations, declining resources, and increasing competition, tools such as integrated planning and budgeting, evidence-based decision-making (EBDM) processes, an overarching continuous quality improvement (CQI) framework, and up-to-date technology solutions for managing planning processes are no longer optional. While Mesa Community College (MCC) has a long history of planning, the integration of planning and budgeting was limited and our planning system was outdated (as in beyond end-of-life outdated). Additionally, planning and budgeting processes lacked EBDM practices and an overarching CQI framework. MCC’s Strategic Planning Committee set about remedying all of these issues and did so within the span of a year.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2016

“Menus That Matter” at the Heart of Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s Bronson Healthy Living Campus

Culinary and food professionals can serve as positive change agents in society.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: We live at a time when increasing numbers of Americans consume food prepared away from home. This trend, along with poor dietary choices and lack of access to healthy, sustainably sourced food, contributes to a reduced quality of life and the onset of preventable disease.
The Culinary Arts and Sustainable Food Systems curriculum recently approved by the Kalamazoo Valley Community College trustees reflects the college’s belief that best practices in urban agriculture, the latest developments in culinary and food production research and technology, and the transformative power of education will improve the health and well-being of our citizens and help sustain our communities. The college believes that culinary and food professionals can serve as positive change agents in society.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2016

Tennessee Promise

Implementation and Outcomes at Two Diverse Colleges

The Tennessee Promise will change the face of educational attainment for Tennesseans.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: The Tennessee Promise has become a cornerstone of Tennessee’s higher education initiatives and has propelled the state to the forefront as a national leader in supporting higher education opportunities for high school graduates. Through a state-established endowment, the funding for the first two years of community or technical college is available to all high school graduates. The program combines student timeliness in complying with requirements and completing service activities, community mentors and involvement, high school counseling and marketing, and college engagement. This article provides an explanation of the Promise program and an overview of its implementation at two distinct Tennessee community colleges.

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