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Your Higher Education Planning Library

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Example Plans

Published
November 13, 2023

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Example Plans

Published
January 24, 2023

Supporting Document

Public Doctoral/Research University (California, United States)

Annual updates on academic affairs’ progress made toward the diversity, equity, and inclusion plan.

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Example Plans

Published
January 24, 2023

Strategic Plan, Strategic Planning Website

Multiple Locations

This strategic plan for a state system of community colleges defines its contribution to the state's workforce development goal.

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Example Plans

Published
February 23, 2022

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 14, 2021

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Good Academic Planning Is What Happens . . .

. . . When Opportunity Meets with Integration

The division of Academic Affairs at the University of West Georgia worked with SCUP to integrate academic planning with facilities, accreditation, budget, student affairs, and student success.

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: The division of Academic Affairs at the University of West Georgia became involved with the Society for College and University Planning and integrated planning over four years ago. The result was slowly integrating academic planning with facilities, accreditation, budget, student affairs, and student success. Just as Thomas Edison was probably not thinking about integrated planning when he was quoted on planning, we had no idea how fruitful our efforts would become. We enhanced and assessed student scheduling, learning spaces, faculty support, and student success and support services in a meaningful way that resulted in positive and measurable outcomes for improving learning and reducing costs.

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Conference Recordings

Published
March 19, 2021

2021 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

After the Fall

Including Faculty in Retention Efforts Without Burnout

Come learn how you can plan and coordinate campus-wide retention efforts and promote faculty participation at your institution.
Abstract: Retention matters for practical (keeping the doors open), ethical (successfully educating students), and cultural reasons (improving campus climate, which in turn improves retention and persistence.) In this session, we'll focus on the effective and budget-conscious retention efforts for a northeastern regional public institution. While administrative staff played an essential role, educating and coordinating faculty made a key difference in the success of these efforts. Come learn how you can plan and coordinate campus-wide retention efforts and promote faculty participation at your institution.

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Blog Post

Published
February 22, 2021

Strategies for Engaging Faculty in Change

In difficult times, planning and the successful implementation of that planning requires the buy-in and support of a range of stakeholders—particularly the faculty. We interviewed Sandra Patterson-Randles, chancellor emerita and professor of English at Indiana University Southeast, to discuss how to best engage faculty in planning initiatives.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
January 14, 2021

The Faculty Factor

Creating Buy-In for Difficult Planning

In this session we explore the successes and failures involved in two planning initiatives that required broad-based faculty support in order to reverse issues with programmatic quality, student success, and institutional accreditation.
Abstract: In difficult times, planning and the successful implementation of that planning require the buy-in and support of a whole range of stakeholders–but particularly the faculty, since they carry out the institution’s teaching and research missions.

Faculty can make or break successful planning.

An institution must be very circumspect in their choice of representative faculty for planning groups, how they are engaged in the planning process, and how they interact with other campus constituencies for maximum buy-in. This endeavor is particularly difficult when the new planning process follows previous attempts that have failed because of faculty resistance or lack of meaningful involvement. This session details successful planning initiatives at two regional universities, one in the Midwest and one in the southern Northeast, where earlier planning efforts failed because of “the faculty factor.”

Join us to explore the successes and failures involved in these two planning initiatives that required broad-based faculty support in order to reverse issues with programmatic quality, student success, and institutional accreditation.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 23, 2020

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Planning for Instructional Continuity

Develop a Communication and Implementation Strategy Before a Short-Term Class Disruption Happens

Classes can be cancelled because of inclement weather, faculty being unavailable, IT or power outages, pandemic-related closures, and other occurrences. The result of any of these circumstances can be a loss of instruction. St. Joseph’s University developed and applied a best practices guide to ensure the continuation of instruction in the advent of many short-term disruptions.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: When a class is cancelled because of weather, faculty unavailability, IT outage, power outage, or pandemic-related closure, it can result in a loss of instruction. This article details best practices for instructional continuity for many short-term disruptions. Different types of short-term disruptions are identified, as well as how they impact instruction based on course modality. Finally, the article suggests responses for the circumstances, provides a pathway to collaborate with faculty to create a best practices guide for instructional continuity, and shows how to develop a communication and implementation strategy for the plan to reset expectations about instructional disruptions.

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