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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.
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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Designing the University of the FutureLocked

From Volume 34 Number 2 | January–March 2006
These authors identify transforming trends in society that are affecting the mission of universities, analyze the impact of those trends on the institutional and spatial structure of universities, and then summarize the factors that planners should be paying attention to in the future design of their institutions.
Planning for Higher Education Journal

Planning for Cost-Efficiencies in Online LearningLocked

From Volume 33 Number 3 | March–May 2005
Planning and planners must take the lead in ensuring that the design of on-line learning programs is both cost-efficient and productive. This must happen with some urgency because the gap between online learning models and implementation has been closing more rapidly than planners’ knowledge about online learning has been growing.
Planning for Higher Education Journal

Research Space: Who Needs It, Who Gets It, Who Pays for It?Locked

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004
An overview of research space management in the United States, based on interviews with senior administrators, Internet documents, and the authors’ vast experience, identifies important trends that need attention.
Planning for Higher Education Journal

The Road Less Traveled: Sustainable Transportation for CampusesLocked

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003
The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy to shift many trips from single occupant automobiles to other modes of travel.
Planning for Higher Education Journal

User-Driven Planning for Digital-Image DeliveryLocked

From Volume 34 Number 3 | April–June 2006
Writing for “informed generalists” rather than IT experts or systems development experts, the authors report on user-needs assessment issues for academic digital-image management and retrieval systems: “Content is king” and content needs are dynamic, not static.
Planning for Higher Education Journal

MIT Campus Planning 1960-2000: An Annotated ChronologyLocked

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004
Planning for Higher Education Journal

Phased Transformations of Academic Buildings

Can’t vacate the facility? Renovation in stages can be planned efficiently.
From Volume 48 Number 1 | October–December 2019
When you’re renovating a campus building, you’re contending with dust, noise, vibration, the risk of budget overruns, relocating occupants, extended timelines, and more. Following best practices of experienced planners can help you to mitigate the most common challenges.
Webinar Recordings

Back to School Through the Lens of ASHRAE

Published 2020
Recorded June 15. Panelists Susanna M. Baker, MIT Sloan School of Management, and Bill Bahnfleth, ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) and Penn State University, discussed requirements for a typical campus upgrade and reviewed ASHRAE recommendations on improving campus safety in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. They also addressed some of the unique challenges for an urban campus response to maintaining campus safety.
Webinar Recordings

The Impact of COVID-19 on Construction on Campus

Published 2020
Recorded August 26. This webinar will focus on how higher education campus construction is impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and its positive and negative implications on construction sites on the MIT and Northeastern University campuses. Panelists will share case studies of how on-campus construction has changed, the new supply chains, and staff management consideration.

This is part of the series “Less Talk, More Action: Tactical Topics to Return to Campus.”