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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 31, 2022

Book Review: Stories from the Educational Underground

The New Frontier for Learning and Work

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: Stories from the Educational Underground: The New Frontier for Learning and Work
by Peter Smith
Kendall Hunt Publishing: Dubuque, Iowa: 2021
148 pages
ISBN 978-1792472930

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 13, 2021

Planning for Equity-Centered Transformation

We must abandon the traditional three- to five-year planning cycle in favor of combining a macro-planning approach with shorter-term sprints (quick-turnaround scenario planning flexibility) to meet the changing needs of our students and communities.
Abstract: A pandemic, a rollercoaster economy, and continued racial injustice require going beyond realignment, redesign, and reform to equity-based transformation. How can we effectively tear down systemic barriers in everything from student access and success to teaching and learning? What will rebuilding for transformation look like? We must abandon the traditional three- to five-year planning cycle in favor of combining a macro-planning approach with shorter-term sprints (quick-turnaround scenario planning flexibility) to meet the changing needs of our students and communities.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 26, 2021

Keep on Keepin’ on

Customized Retention Practices Helped Low Income and Single Mom Students to Persist

A support program for low-income and/or single-mother students to improve their persistence and retention was revisited 15 years after it had been launched at Charter Oak State College. Did follow-up with the graduates show that the effort had aided the former participants in obtaining their college degree? Had the collaboration between the institution’s Academic Services, Enrollment Management, and Financial Aid departments—and the support they offered—help the students to persevere? Based on survey results, was the program still of value, and what improvements needed to be made?

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: This article is based on follow-up survey research from a doctoral case study that highlighted effective retention practices for low-income and/or single mothers who were students within the Women in Transition (WIT) program at Charter Oak State College. The concept of retention in this instance is an enrollment management practice aimed at maintaining a student population while aiding the institution in sustaining organizational success. Emphasis is placed on the retention concepts of social and academic integration that enabled the specific population to persist and succeed.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 19, 2020

2020 North Central Regional Conference | October 2020

Making Colleges Student Ready

It’s About Time!

We will share a tool we developed through the National Institutes for Historically-Underserved Students for institutions to assess their readiness to support underserved students. In this session, you will learn about this tool and the detailed survey of relevant research that went into its development as well as discover how you can employ this tool on your campus.
Abstract: Equity and inclusion on campus has never been more important and institutions must come to terms with their current practices in order to improve them. We will share a tool we developed through the National Institutes for Historically-Underserved Students for institutions to assess their readiness to support underserved students. A detailed survey of relevant research went into the development of this readiness tool. In this session, you will learn about this tool and the detailed survey of relevant research that went into its development as well as discover how you can employ this tool on your campus.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
April 27, 2020

Voices from the Field: Episode #4

Empowering Underrepresented Students for the Long Term During Crisis and Contingency Planning

Pat McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University in Washington, DC, discusses how her all-women’s undergrad program is maintaining support for underrepresented students.
Abstract: Support for underrepresented students must continue now and in a post-COVID-19 world. How is this getting tackled in an all-women’s undergrad program that serves underrepresented students? Pat McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University (DC), discusses her university’s approach—from crisis planning through contingency planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 2003

Indiana’s Twenty-First Century Scholars Program

Indiana’s Twenty-First Century Scholars program effectively meets the needs of high-risk and low-income students by understanding the student’s mind-set, providing mentoring relationships, being flexible with credit load minimums, and utilizing alumni for student recruitment.

From Volume 32 Number 2 | December–February 2003

Abstract: This case study analyzes the impact of Indiana’s Twenty-First Century Scholars college tuition discount program on the academic self-efficacy of high-risk, low-income students. The program is designed to increase the number of high-risk individuals attending college. The self-efficacy “training” of the program helps instill and reinforce the idea that success or failure coincides with internal effort and not external factors. Surveys were completed by 55 program participants and 42 institutional representatives at different colleges in Indiana. The program increased students’ understanding of the feasibility of attaining a college degree, heightened students’ academic confidence, and improved their overall self-esteem. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of this program for academic planners developing programs to help high-risk students succeed in college.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1973

The Adult Student

Trends and Options

From Volume 2 Number 2 | April 1973

Abstract: Among the many reforms currently sweeping higher education is the growing demand that formal educational opportunity be opened to adults. The result has been expansion of traditional continuing education and extension programs as well as a plethora of new and experimental programs aimed at the adult student. In an attempt to bring some order out of the resulting chaos, Jane Lord, a researcher for Educational Facilities Laboratories, and Ronald H. Miller, project coordinator for the New York City Regional Center for Life-Long Learning at Pace College, have reviewed the literature on adult education to produce this article, discussing the trends and the options open to institutions of higher education. An extensive bibliography is included.

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