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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
November 9, 2021

Designing and Developing Mature, Mission-Aligned Online Academic Programs at Jesuit Institutions

This is a SCUP Fellow Research Project Final Report for the 2019–2020 program. Online education should not be perceived as a distraction of the mission—rather, an enhancement of it.
Abstract: Online academic programs can bring your institution's mission to life . . . but it won't happen by accident. You need processes that intentionally integrate your mission into course design and development. This research examines these processes at Jesuit institutions, using a maturity model to evaluate how the mission is considered and acted upon during instructional design. The insights and advice shared can help any institution, from community colleges to research universities. Learn how you can start bringing your mission to life in your online courses.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 13, 2021

Mission-Aligned Online Academic Programs at US Jesuit Institutions

Identify and Implement Practices That Mature the Development of Courses

A custom survey measured the process maturity involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating online offerings that reflected the principles of Ignatian Pedagogy.

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: The purpose of the research was to observe process maturity associated with the design and development of mission-aligned online academic programs at Jesuit institutions in the United States. Twenty of the twenty-seven American Jesuit institutions were represented, including respondents who were most responsible for implementing the process used to design and develop online courses and programs. A custom survey was created to measure the process maturity involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating the design and development. The research design focused on narrative analysis of each institutional mission, which identified themes and keywords that were included in the custom survey.

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TaP Into SCUP

Published
April 15, 2021

Advancing Institutional Sexual Violence Prevention Education Through Faculty Research: Part 2

A Perspective From a Department Chair

Professor Armstrong describes the college's particular interest in sexual assault prevention and highlights the critical role that academic department chairs can play in designing institutional research partnerships that support faculty interests as well as the institution's.
Abstract: Professor Armstrong describes the college's particular interest in sexual assault prevention and highlights the critical role that academic department chairs can play in designing institutional research partnerships that support faculty interests as well as the institution's. She emphasizes many faculty's long term commitment to campus health and wellbeing and offers a clear-eyed view about how to leverage faculty research skills for campus goals.

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TaP Into SCUP

Published
April 15, 2021

Advancing Institutional Sexual Violence Prevention Education Through Faculty Research: Part 3

A Perspective From a Faculty Researcher

Dr. Cuomo, a pre-tenure feminist geographer, describes the research project at the heart of Lafayette College's initiative and shares her perspective on the potential for similar institutional research partnerships in higher education.
Abstract: Dr. Cuomo, a pre-tenure feminist geographer, describes her background and research agenda pertaining to sexual assault victim advocacy, education, and prevention. She describes the research project at the heart of Lafayette College's initiative and shares her perspective on the potential for similar institutional research partnerships in higher education.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 26, 2021

Keep on Keepin’ on

Customized Retention Practices Helped Low Income and Single Mom Students to Persist

A support program for low-income and/or single-mother students to improve their persistence and retention was revisited 15 years after it had been launched at Charter Oak State College. Did follow-up with the graduates show that the effort had aided the former participants in obtaining their college degree? Had the collaboration between the institution’s Academic Services, Enrollment Management, and Financial Aid departments—and the support they offered—help the students to persevere? Based on survey results, was the program still of value, and what improvements needed to be made?

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: This article is based on follow-up survey research from a doctoral case study that highlighted effective retention practices for low-income and/or single mothers who were students within the Women in Transition (WIT) program at Charter Oak State College. The concept of retention in this instance is an enrollment management practice aimed at maintaining a student population while aiding the institution in sustaining organizational success. Emphasis is placed on the retention concepts of social and academic integration that enabled the specific population to persist and succeed.

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Report

Published
October 1, 2015

Succeeding at Planning Survey Report

Results from the 2015 Survey of Higher Education Leaders

SCUP partnered with the Baker Strategy Group in 2015 to conduct a study with more than 2,200 leaders who plan at colleges and universities. Several themes emerged around planning challenges and how to respond, which are explored in this report.
Abstract: Succeeding at integrated planning at colleges and universities is a challenge. Many planning models do not work in higher education because they are not designed for higher education. Planning processes designed for corporations or non-profits do not account for the complex environment of higher education nor its unique challenges.

Many institutions struggle to leverage planning into lasting change because they create plans in a vacuum. They do not grasp the institution’s strategic issues or create a sound value proposition. They are not prepared for good planning.

To provide guidance on where to prioritize efforts, SCUP partnered with the Baker Strategy Group in 2015 to conduct a study with more than 2,200 leaders who plan at colleges and universities, and ran quantitative analysis on their responses. Several themes emerged around planning challenges and how to respond, which are explored in this report.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2013

Cultivating the Future of Graduate Education

Factors Contributing to Salary for Recent Doctorate Degree Recipients

Like any individual seeking to make a rational decision, doctoral students must decide if the benefits of earning this degree outweigh the costs.

From Volume 41 Number 4 | July–September 2013

Abstract: The number of individuals receiving a U.S. doctorate degree continues to grow; however, we know little about the precise factors that affect wages for recent doctorate recipients over time. Using data from approximately 10,000 respondents who completed the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, the study presented in this article examines factors contributing to wage growth over the time period 1999–2008. Findings show wage benefits for degree recipients over the decade, but also show significant differences by gender, race, discipline, and other characteristics. Findings have strong implications for individuals who may consider doctorate or other advanced training, for academic planners, and for policies in graduate education.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2013

Conversations With Central Administration

Facilitating Communication and Partnerships in New Program Development

Central administration is not creating curriculum; rather, it is encouraging the faculty to understand limitations and embrace broad institutional visions.

From Volume 41 Number 3 | March–May 2013

Abstract: The role of central administration in program development varies from institution to institution. Applications of shared governance, differences in state regulations, and evolving institutional procedures result in dissimilar administrative structures. This article reports on the role of central administration in new program development, as discussed by 13 senior academic officers at 12 public universities in the Carnegie Research Universities/Very High classification. The themes of fostering institutional communication and partnerships emerged in the interviews. In addition, the perceptions of the assistant provosts, associate provosts, and vice provosts responsible for the process are included.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2013

“Be Prepared” for Policy Windows

Cultivating Campus Change

How can universities overcome the institutional inertia that impedes successful innovation and change?

From Volume 41 Number 3 | March–May 2013

Abstract: While universities recognize the need for change, establishing an environment conducive to change requires time and movement through stages. In this article, I examine different tools and processes that can pave the way for innovation or change. These processes became evident in my research on the emergence of an interdisciplinary policy school jointly established on two campuses where previous models did not exist. The change came about because there was a confluence of forces that promoted it; these factors were strong enough to negate the barriers. There were key actions undertaken by the universities that promoted the change, including systematic program review, university-wide integrated planning, the appointment of an executive sponsor who had social and political capital, and the establishment of a “grassroots” working committee comprising faculty who were passionate about the initiative. However, there were equally important practices and policies that hindered the movement forward; these included institutional procedures that required multiple levels of approval in a lock-step process and the many facets of resistance to change. For universities contemplating a change agenda, the implementation of some of these processes and tools could potentially be beneficial in moving forward.

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