SCUP
 

Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

FOUND 11 RESOURCES

REFINED BY:

  • Planning Type: Academic Planningx
  • Tags: External Collaboration / Partnershipsx

Clear All
ABSTRACT:  | 
SORT BY:  | 
Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 19, 2022

Partnerships Promote Inclusion

A university and a secondary school collaborate to decrease dropout rates and increase college enrollment

Intentional planning and a competency-based, personalized learning model empowers graduate students from the architecture discipline to assist secondary students in becoming knowledge seekers and design professionals.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: American industries, professional organizations, individual companies, and higher education institutions continue to struggle to attract employees from underrepresented populations. Future-forward thinking is required to ensure a multicultural workforce. The authors, a design educator at a predominantly white, Midwestern university, and a high school principal at a multicultural urban school district, developed an intentional collaboration—partnerships between secondary and postsecondary institutions—to bridge the gap. In this article, they share strategies they developed for recruiting and retaining underrepresented students through intentional planning and design of competency-based, personalized learning models.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Blog

Published
October 6, 2021

Today’s Landscape for Non-Degree Credentials

We recently spoke with Michelle Van Noy about research she has completed in the area of non-degree credentials, including development of a framework for measuring credential quality. Dr. Van Noy is the Director of the Education and Employment Research Center at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Conference Recordings

Published
July 16, 2021

Universities on Fire

Higher Education in the Age of Climate Crisis

This session explores the impact of climate change on higher education and how academia may respond.
Abstract: This session explores the impact of climate change on higher education and how academia may respond. We begin by examining potential changes to physical campuses, from transportation and food service to grounds and the built environment. Next we consider implications for university research, curriculum, and teaching, then envision how relationships between campuses, their local communities, and the world. We conclude by outlining ways academic institutions can strategize and plan for medium- and long-term transformation, starting now.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Non-Member Price:
$50

Conference Recordings

Published
March 8, 2021

2021 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

The Kitchens

How a Culinary Arts Program Supports Community Revitalization

In this session, you'll learn how RCC delivers culinary workforce training and academic programs in a satellite facility at the heart of a poverty-concentrated area, pushing back economic isolation and promoting learning and health.
Abstract: The Kitchens at Reynolds Community College (RCC) exemplify a developing national model, featuring public and private organizations in a successful collective effort to boost economic development and healthier outcomes in a historically under-resourced community. Integrated planning for The Kitchens involves community partnerships and collaboration in education, health and wellness, workforce training, and economic revitalization. In this session, you'll learn how RCC delivers culinary workforce training and academic programs in a satellite facility at the heart of a poverty-concentrated area, pushing back economic isolation and promoting learning and health.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Non-Member Price:
$50

Webinar Recordings

Published
March 2, 2021

How to Create a Secondary-Postsecondary Partnership to Promote Diversity, Inclusion, and Underrepresented Populations in Higher Education

This webinar will focus on how to develop a secondary-postsecondary partnership to intentionally promote diversity, inclusion, and recognition of under-represented populations through collaboration and integrated planning strategies. The presenters will share their goals and project planning for a competency-based, project-based learning model—with an emphasis on mentoring.
Abstract: Institutions of higher learning and professional firms report concerns about lack of diversity in the workplace. Intentional partnerships can help bridge this gap. This webinar will focus on how to develop a secondary-postsecondary partnership to intentionally promote diversity, inclusion, and recognition of under-represented populations through collaboration and integrated planning strategies.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Non-Member Price:
$69

Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 6, 2019

2019 Southern Regional Conference | October 2019

Educating the Next Generation of Industry Leaders

This session will illustrate how industry-academic partnerships have led to the creation of cutting-edge, career-focused education that reimagines vocational training through a new, didactic construction sciences facility.
Abstract: This session will illustrate how industry-academic partnerships have led to the creation of cutting-edge, career-focused education that reimagines vocational training through a new, didactic construction sciences facility. With a skilled labor shortage in the construction industry, this program hopes to close that gap while creating an attractive, career-focused educational alternative to the traditional four-year college education. Beginning in middle and high schools and continuing through the workplace, developing new partnerships along the education continuum helps to reimagine workforce education and facilities to inspire the next generation of construction industry leaders.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2019

Middle Skills Education

Planners Are Reimagining Ways to Meld Instruction and Industry

Many jobs of the future will require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree. How should we prepare the next generation of employees?

From Volume 47 Number 4 | July–September 2019

Abstract: Middle skills education, personalized curriculum, and student-directed training are playing an increasingly integral role in higher education. A new generation of students is already likely to hold different educational expectations and desires than their predecessors. Accommodating those trends means planners, architects, and higher education administrators will need to think differently about how they train skilled workers for the most needed professions.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2016

The Power of “Systemness”

A Collaborative Approach Aids Workers in New York State

What was needed was an organized, comprehensive program to equip workers with the skills to survive and thrive in the world of 21st-century manufacturing.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: The community colleges in the State University of New York system leveraged “systemness”—the idea that working together can greatly enhance the possibility of positive results—in creating a statewide program to retrain dislocated TAA-eligible workers and returning veterans for high-quality, high-paying jobs in the skilled manufacturing sector. By aligning with the strengths of each college, curricula in areas such as photonics, optics, advanced manufacturing and machining, and semiconductors and mechatronics were created, leading to a diploma or certification and thus to increased probability of hiring. Regional employers and government workforce agencies were also part of the leadership teams, helping to create programming that was specifically focused on the needs of these vital industries.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2013

“Be Prepared” for Policy Windows

Cultivating Campus Change

How can universities overcome the institutional inertia that impedes successful innovation and change?

From Volume 41 Number 3 | March–May 2013

Abstract: While universities recognize the need for change, establishing an environment conducive to change requires time and movement through stages. In this article, I examine different tools and processes that can pave the way for innovation or change. These processes became evident in my research on the emergence of an interdisciplinary policy school jointly established on two campuses where previous models did not exist. The change came about because there was a confluence of forces that promoted it; these factors were strong enough to negate the barriers. There were key actions undertaken by the universities that promoted the change, including systematic program review, university-wide integrated planning, the appointment of an executive sponsor who had social and political capital, and the establishment of a “grassroots” working committee comprising faculty who were passionate about the initiative. However, there were equally important practices and policies that hindered the movement forward; these included institutional procedures that required multiple levels of approval in a lock-step process and the many facets of resistance to change. For universities contemplating a change agenda, the implementation of some of these processes and tools could potentially be beneficial in moving forward.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2010

Distance Education

A University's Pioneering Master of Social Work Program Partnership with the U.S. Army

Learn how a partnership between Florida State and the US Army planned for and implemented tailored MSW degrees.

From Volume 38 Number 4 | July–September 2010

Abstract: In February 2008, the U.S. Army and Fayetteville State University established a partnership that has changed the process of healthcare education for active duty social workers. Before this time, the army relied on public universities to be solely responsible for recruiting, evaluating, and educating active duty social workers to serve the needs of service members and their families. However, to meet an immediate need for more social workers to deal with the wounds caused by the War on Terror and to help it get the best possible return on its educational investment, the army decided to partner with a university to establish a distance education Master of Social Work program at the Army Medical Department Center and School at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina was the university partner selected. This article outlines the background of the partnership and the issues other public universities should consider if they want to partner with the military or another federal agency. The article also highlights the benefits of such a partnership.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access